Yamaha Exhibits Silent Strings at Chamber Music America Conference

4/8/2005 [Strings]

A string quartet made up entirely of Yamaha Corporation of America Silent string instruments highlighted the company's first-ever exhibit at the annual Chamber Music America conference this January in New York, a visit that signals closer ties in the future between the performers' group and the world's largest manufacturer of musical instruments.

BUENA PARK, CA (April 8, 2005) — A string quartet made up entirely of Yamaha Corporation of America Silent string instruments highlighted the company’s first-ever exhibit at the annual Chamber Music America conference this January in New York, a visit that signals closer ties in the future between the performers’ group and the world’s largest manufacturer of musical instruments.

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Yamaha Viola Artist Martha Mooke brought her quartet Scorchio to the three-day event, where the group created a stir by demonstrating the Yamaha Silent Electric String Quartet – a suite of instruments comprising two Silent or Studio Solid-body violins (SV-120 or SV-200), the Silent Viola (SVV-200) and the Silent Cello (SVC-50/100/200). The quartet was plugged into a sound system, but the speakers were turned off most of the time, and the audience was invited to pick up a set of headphones to hear what the quartet was playing.

In addition to Mooke, Scorchio includes violinists Gregor Kitzis and Jonathan Dinklage and cellist Leah Coloff.

“Our members found the Yamaha presentations to be an innovative application of electronic technology, offering all the benefits of amplification with an impressive sound quality,” says Chamber Music America Chief Executive Officer Margaret M. Lioi. “Chamber Music America was delighted to provide a showcase for Yamaha’s Silent String Quartet Series.”

“Having a professional quality string quartet of Silent Electric instruments, we feel that Chamber Music America is a perfect organizational partner for Yamaha,” says Daryl Silberman, Product Specialist, Strings, Yamaha Band & Orchestral Division. “We are all interested in honoring performing music’s past and perpetuating its future. An electric string quartet can either play classical or contemporary music, and the Silent Electric String Quartet offers existing quartets not only something to help solve sound amplification issues, but also gives a contemporary edge to groups looking to connect to younger and newer audiences.”

Also helping Yamaha to put a stamp on the annual gathering was Yamaha Violinist Christian Howes.

Chamber Music America was founded in 1977 to promote artistic excellence and economic stability within the profession, and to ensure that chamber music, in its broadest sense, is a vital part of American life. Its annual meeting features workshops, seminars, roundtables, and demonstrations designed to strengthen participants’ skills in a range of career-based and professional development areas. Live music is an integral element of the conference, and each meeting has several concerts and in-session musical demonstrations. For more information, visit www.chamber-music.org.

“Everyone who represented Yamaha at the CMA conference found a warm welcome and a lively exchange of ideas,” says Roger Eaton, Director of Marketing, Band & Orchestral Division, Yamaha Corporation of America. “Our success in every segment of the musical instrument market has always been tied closely to the ranks of professional artists who work with us, and my hope is that our participation in this year’s Chamber Music America gathering will be the first step in a long and mutually beneficial relationship.”

For more information, write Yamaha Corporation of America, Band & Orchestral Division, P.O. Box 6600, Buena Park, CA 90622, telephone (714) 522-9011, e-mail infostation@yamaha.com or visit www.yamaha.com/strings.



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